“Which English translation of Crime and Punishment should I read?”

So you want to read Fyodor Dostoevsky’s psychological masterpiece, Crime and Punishment. And you don’t read Russian.

No problem. The novel, originally published in 12 monthly installments in 1866 and as a single volume in 1867, has been available in English since 1885 and widely available in English since 1914. You’ll find a copy in any decent library or bookstore, and if you like reading ebooks, you can download the novel for free because it’s not under copyright. That’s sorted, then.

Not so fast!

As soon as you visit the library or bookshop or click over to Amazon, you realize there are a host of publishers offering a myriad of paperback and hardcover editions and dozens of digital versions. What’s the difference?

The good news is, the book is seldom abridged, so you won’t accidentally settle for a book that’s shorter than you would have wanted. Still, there are a variety of translations available, and opinions differ about their merits. Keep reading to learn how to choose an edition that’s right for you.

Crime and Punishment: Translation History

I count thirteen translations of Crime and Punishment, seven of which are in-print (shown in bold below).

  1. 1885 – Frederick Whishaw
  2. 1914 – Constance Garnett
  3. 1951 – David Magarshack
  4. 1953 – Princess Alexandra Kropotkin
  5. 1953 – Jessie Coulson
  6. 1963 – Michael Scammell
  7. 1968 – Sidney Monas
  8. 1985 – Julius Katzer
  9. 1991 – David McDuff
  10. 1992 – Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky
  11. 2014 – Oliver Ready
  12. 2017 – Nicolas Pasternak Slater
  13. 2018 – Michael R. Katz

Nov 2021: By request, the list below is updated to include information on out-of-print translations!

Crime and Punishment: Translation Comparison

Extracts from different translations of Crime and Punishment have been included below so that you can see how they sound.

 
1885 · Frederick Whishaw · Crime and Punishment

Who was Frederick Whishaw?

He was a British writer, historian, and musician. He was born in Russia, grew up in England, moved back to Russia at age 16 to work, and returned to England at age 26. He wrote poetry, novels, stories for children, and books on Russian history. Some of his works, including his translation of Uncle’s Dream AND The Permanent Husband by Dostoevsky, are available at Project Gutenberg. He also translated Dostoevsky’s The Idiot, Humiliated and Insulted aka Injury and Insult, and The Friend of the Family AND The Gambler. If you’re searching for Whishaw’s translations, it’s useful to know that the author’s name was spelled Fedor Dostoieffsky or Fedor Dostoïeffsky.

Extract from the Whishaw translation of Crime and Punishment

Get the Courage Classics Giant Whishaw translation of Crime and Punishment

Includes an essay by Philip Rahv and a letter by the author. 527 pages. This book is out of print. You may be able to find a used copy for sale online using the links below.

Available as a hardcover (ISBN 9781561387144).

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Get the Everyman's Library Whishaw translation of Crime and Punishment

Includes an introduction by Laurence Irving and a list of characters. 1925 reprint of 1911 edition.

Available as a scan digitized by Google from the University of Virgina.

View scan at Hathi Trust (USA)

Get the Everyman's Library Whishaw translation of Crime and Punishment

Includes a list of characters. 1921 reprint of 1911 edition.

Available as a scan digitized by Google from the University of Virgina.

View scan at Hathi Trust (USA)

Get the Dent/Dutton Whishaw translation of Crime and Punishment

Includes an introduction by Laurence Irving and a list of characters. 1910 reprint of 1908 edition.

Available as a scan.

View scan at Archive.org

1914 · Constance Garnett · Crime and Punishment

Who was Constance Garnett?

Constance Garnett translated a TON of stuff from Russian. Wikipedia says 71 volumes! She is credited with making many Russian works accessible in English. Her contribution to world literature is nothing to sneeze at. Vladimir Nabokov and Joseph Brodsky, nevertheless, accused her writing of being flat and of remaining the same regardless of whom she was translating.

Readers’ opinions vary about whether Garnett’s translation of Crime and Punishment is good. Commentators can’t even agree whether the text sounds Victorian and stilted or surprisingly smooth and modern. Some people say Garnett’s version was thankfully superseded long ago, and others say it never can or will be.

I’m inclined to side with those who uphold Garnett’s translation. Those who praise it sound not just nostalgic but also sensible, and those who criticize it are often motivated to praise newer translations simply because they are newer (or because they sound newer), and perhaps feel it’s safe to attack the work of someone who’s not around to defend it.

Since the translation is old, the copyright has expired, and anyone can republish the text. That means there are a lot of versions with this translation, and they’re cheap.

If you open a copy of Crime and Punishment and there’s an unsigned “Translator’s Preface” or “Translator’s Note” that starts by saying, “A few words about Dostoevsky himself may help the English reader to understand his work,” then you’ve got a copy of the Garnett translation. You can also cross-check against the wording of the beginning of Chapter 1 (see excerpt below).

About the Garnett translation of Crime and Punishment

Extract from the Garnett translation of Crime and Punishment

Get the Wordsworth Classics Garnett translation of Crime and Punishment

Includes an introduction and notes by Dr. Keith Carabine, a bibliography, a map, and a list of characters.

Available as a paperback (ISBN 9781840224306, 528 pages).

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Includes an introduction and notes by Dr. Keith Carabine, a bibliography, a map, and a list of characters.

Available as an ebook (ISBN 9781848703506).

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Get the Barnes & Noble Classics Garnett translation of Crime and Punishment

It has been モrevised thoroughlyヤ by Juliya Salkovskaya and Nicholas Rice and includes the following materials: about the author, historical context / chronology, introduction by Priscilla Meyer, list of characters, portrait of author, St. Petersburg map, inspired byナ, comments and questions, further reading.

Available as a paperback (ISBN 9781593080815, 576 pages).

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Get the Barnes & Noble Classics Garnett translation of Crime and Punishment

It has been モrevised thoroughlyヤ by Juliya Salkovskaya and Nicholas Rice and includes the following materials: about the author, historical context / chronology, introduction by Priscilla Meyer, list of characters, portrait of author, St. Petersburg map, inspired byナ, comments and questions, further reading.

Available as an ebook (ISBN 9781411432017).

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Get the Word Cloud Classics Garnett translation of Crime and Punishment

You can buy an ebook version (ISBN 9781684123537), but I don't know why you would, because this is a showy book designed to look good. The features have nothing to do with the text itself, which is (as far as I can tell) just a standard reprint. Features: clean, modern aesthetic, flexible vinyl covers, specially-designed endpapers, foil-stamping, cute size (5.25? x 7.75?).

Available as a flexibound book (ISBN 9781684122905, 528 pages).

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Get the Macmillan Collector's Library Garnett translation of Crime and Punishment

The main thing to note about this edition is its small size (and small font size). It's 4.2 x 1.4 x 6.1 inches, set in Plantin, 8.5 pt / line height 10.5pt. The materials the book is made from are really nice: cloth binding and good paper. It has an afterword by Oliver Francis.

Available as a hardcover (ISBN 9781509827749, 736 pages).

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Get the Simon & Schuster Enriched Classics Garnett translation of Crime and Punishment

Includes: an introduction, a chronology of the author's life and work, a timeline of significant events in history, an outline of key themes and plot points, detailed explanatory notes, critical analysis, discussion, a list of recommended related books and films. Supplementary matrial written by Margaret Brantley.

Available as a mass market paperback (ISBN 9780743487634, 704 pages).

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Get the Simon & Schuster Enriched Classics Garnett translation of Crime and Punishment

Includes: an introduction, a chronology of the author's life and work, a timeline of significant events in history, an outline of key themes and plot points, detailed explanatory notes, critical analysis, discussion, a list of recommended related books and films.

Available as an ebook (ISBN 9781416501817).

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Get the Bantam Classics Garnett translation of Crime and Punishment

Includes an introduction by Joseph Frank.

Available as a mass market paperback (ISBN 9780553211757, 576 pages).

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Get the Bantam Classics Garnett translation of Crime and Punishment

Includes an introduction by Joseph Frank.

Available as an ebook (ISBN 9780553898088).

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Get the Dover Thrift Garnett translation of Crime and Punishment

Includes an introductory note by editor Susan L. Rattiner and a モselection of the Common Core State Standards Initiativeヤ, which is documentation of learning goals relevant to students, teachers, and parents in the US.

Available as a paperback (ISBN 9780486415871, 448 pages).

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Get the Dover Thrift Garnett translation of Crime and Punishment

Includes an introductory note by editor Susan L. Rattiner and a モselection of the Common Core State Standards Initiativeヤ, which is documentation of learning goals relevant to students, teachers, and parents in the US.

Available as an ebook (ISBN 9780486114859).

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Get the Amazon Classics Garnett translation of Crime and Punishment

Available as an ebook.

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Get the Standard Ebooks Garnett translation of Crime and Punishment

Free! Available in epub, Kindle, Kobo, and Advanced epub formats. Standard Ebooks are professionally edited, professionally designed versions of the Project Gutenberg texts.

Available as an ebook.

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Get the Project Gutenberg Garnett translation of Crime and Punishment

Free! Available in html, epub, Kindle, and plain text formats.

Available as an ebook.

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Get the Beehive Garnett translation of Crime and Punishment

Over a hundred color illustrations by Dave McKean and an introduction by Lonny Harrison. Size is 9" x 12".

Available as a slipcased hardcover (ISBN 9781948886123, 346 pages).

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1951 · David Magarshack · Crime and Punishment

Who was David Magarshack?

He was a British writer. In addition to writing fiction and translating works by Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Goncharov, Gogol, and Chekhov, he wrote biographies of several Russian authors, including Dostoyevsky. He was born in Riga, Russia (a city in present-day Latvia), and moved to England in his 20s, eventually becoming a naturalized citizen.

In addition to Crime and Punishment, Magarshack translated The Devils aka Demons, The Idiot, The Brothers Karamazov and a volume entitled “Dostoevsky’s Occasional Writings”.

About the Magarshack translation of Crime and Punishment

Bloggers Karamazov: “David Magarshack, the Penguin Archive, and Translating Dostoevsky: A Chat with Cathy McAteer”
This interview with Cathy McAteer, a postdoctoral researcher in translation studies, is worth reading in its entirety. Regarding his motivation, she says: “Magarshack approached his translation work with a keen sense that the ‘real’ Russia had never been accurately conveyed to British readers in preceding translations.” Regarding his techniques, she says: “[H]e tries his hand at vernacularized dialogue; incorporates Anglicized naming practices…; domesticates culture-specific references; avoids all footnotes [and] frequently tries to smooth out syntax.”

TLS: “Who-knows-he-dunnit?” by Donald Rayfield
“Dostoevsky does not suffer much from David Magarshack’s version, standard [from] the 1950s [to 2018], its blandness notwithstanding.”

Washington Post: “The Desperate Hours” by Michael Dirda
“Currently [in 1992, at the time of the release of the Pevear and Volokhonsky translation] the most used editions of C and P have been those in the Norton Critical Edition (Jessie Coulson’s translation) and the Penguin Modern Classics (David Magarshack’s). There have also been versions by Michael Scammell (best known for his biography of Solzhenitsyn), Sidney Monas and recently, David McDuff, this last a Viking hardcover that will, apparently, replace Magarshack as the standard Penguin paperback.”

The Jolly Traveller Blog: “Two Crime and Punishment Translations Compared” by John Malathronas
Between Garnett and Magarshack, John Malathronas much prefers Magarshack. To show why, he supplies three parallel passages: the opening sentence, the first sentence of Chapter 3, and a sentence from the horse dream in Chapter 5.

Extract from the Magarshack translation of Crime and Punishment

Get the Penguin Magarshack translation of Crime and Punishment

Includes an introduction by the translator. This book is out of print. You may be able to find a used copy for sale online using the links below.

Available as a paperback (ISBN 9780140440232, 564 pages).

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1953 · Princess Alexandra Kropotkin · Crime and Punishment

Who was Princess Alexandra “Sasha” Kropotkin?

She was a writer descended from the Russian Czar Rurik, born in exile in London, only child of the famous anarchist Peter Kropotkin, who renounced the title of Prince. She returned with her family to Russia in her 30s for a few years before settling in New York, where she built a career by writing about traditional women’s topics (cooking, etiquette, etc.).

About the Kropotkin translation of Crime and Punishment

The Kropotkin translation was published by International Collectors Library, but some ICL books say they are the Garnett translation, and thus are in the public domain, whereas the 1953 Kropotkin text is not. The Kropotkin edition says on the title page that it is a “revised translation arranged for modern reading”. To the best of my understanding, the Kropotkin translation is just Garnett’s translation with some parts changed and some parts left out.

Certainly that seems to be the case for her translation of The Brothers Karamazov. Worldcat lists it as “Fyodor Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov. Edited by W. Somerset Maugham in a translation revised by Princess Alexandra Kropotkin. Wood cuts by Louis Hechenbleikner. [Based on the translation of C.C. Garnett. Abridged.].”

Extract from the Kropotkin translation of Crime and Punishment

Get the International Collectors Library Kropotkin translation of Crime and Punishment

To the best of my understanding, this is Alexandra Kropotkin's edited, abridged version of the Garnett translation. This edition includes a color frontispiece and black and white illustrations by Marian Larer, silk ribbon bookmark, and decorative endpapers. Has a synthetic leather cover with gold decoration. 408 pages. This book is out of print. You may be able to find a used copy for sale online using the links below.

Available as a hardcover.

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1953 · Jessie Coulson · Crime and Punishment

Who was Jessie Senior Coulson?

She was a British lexicographer who worked on the Oxford English Dictionary and complied a Russian-English dictionary and a translator of Russian works by Dostoevsky, Turgenev, Gorky, and Chekhov.

About the Coulson translation of Crime and Punishment

The Coulson translation of Crime and Punishment was first published by Oxford University Press in 1953 with the subtitle “A Novel in Six Parts and an Epilogue”. It included an introduction by the translator and a list of characters, and had a map of St. Petersburg printed on the endpapers.

Norton published a critical edition in 1964, a revised critical edition in 1975, and a third edition in 1989. They all say they are “edited by George Gibian”. To the best of my knowledge, this means he chose the essays to be included and added notes, but did not alter the wording of Coulson’s translation. The third edition includes a preface by Gibian, a list of characters, a map of St. Petersburg, content from Dostoevsky’s notebooks and letters, a passage from an early draft, 30 essays, a chronology of his life, and a selected bibliography.

The preface in the 3rd edition states:
“The translation of the novel by Jessie Coulson represents accurately, in contemporary English, Dostoevsky’s nineteenth-century Russian original. It distorts neither through modernization nor through Victorianisms, and it is readable in its own right, instead of sounding like a translation.”

The Coulson translation was also reprinted in the World’s Classics series starting in 1980 and the Oxford World’s Classics series in 1998, reissued in 2008. An introduction and notes by Richard Peace were added in 1995. To the best of my knowledge, Peace did not alter the text of the translation.

The Norton and Oxford editions are all out of print. There are no in-print editions of the Coulson translation.

Extract from the Coulson translation of Crime and Punishment

 

Get the Norton Coulson translation of Crime and Punishment

Includes a preface by George Gibian, a list of characters, a map of St. Petersburg, content from Dostoevsky’s notebooks and letters, a passage from an early draft, 30 essays, a chronology of his life, and a selected bibliography. This book is out of print. You may be able to find a used copy for sale online using the links below.

Available as a paperback (ISBN 9780393956238, 708 pages).

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Get the Oxford World's Classics Coulson translation of Crime and Punishment

Includes an introduction and notes by Richard Peace, a bibliography, a chronology, a map, and a list of characters. Cover illustration is detail from They did not expect him 1884-8 by Ilya Repin, photo RIA Novosti. This book is out of print. You may be able to find a used copy for sale online using the links below.

Available as a paperback (ISBN 9780199536368, 576 pages).

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1963 · Michael Scammell · Crime and Punishment

Who is Michael Scammell?

He is a British writer and Slavic scholar known for his prizewinning 1984 biography of Russian writer Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. He is also the author of a prizewinning biography of British writer Arthur Koestler published in 2009 and he translated Tolstoy’s Childhood, Boyhood and Youth and some works by Vladimir Nabokov. He has written for a number of newspapers, magazines, and journals.

» Visit his website at michaelscammell.com.

About the Scammell translation of Crime and Punishment

Published by Washington Square Press, Scammell’s was the first American translation of Crime and Punishment. It is based on “the authoritative Russian text” of its time.

Extract from the Scammell translation of Crime and Punishment

Get the Washington Square Press Scammell translation of Crime and Punishment

Includes an introdction by Michael Scammell and a selected bibliography. 596 pages. No ISBN. Product number w-721. This book is out of print. You may be able to find a used copy for sale online using the links below.

Available as a mass-market paperback.

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Get the Washington Square Enriched Classics Scammell translation of Crime and Punishment

1976 edition. Reader's supplement prepared under the supervision of an editorial committee directed by Harry Shefter. Introduction by Michael Scammell. This book is out of print. You may be able to find a used copy for sale online using the links below.

Available as a mass-market paperback (ISBN 9780671487874, 574 pages).

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1968 · Sidney Monas · Crime and Punishment

Who was Sidney Monas?

Sidney Monas sounds like an amazing guy. An American Jew, he was captured and thought to have died in World War II but survived, returned, and took up academic life in Princeton, and went on to earn a PhD from Harvard. Not bad for a dead guy! He died for real in 2019 at the age of 94.

People don’t seem to talk much about his translation of Crime and Punishment, even though it’s still in print. His version is mentioned in some of the articles about newer versions, but nobody seems to champion it.

Extract from the Signet / Monas translation of Crime and Punishment

Get the Signet Classics Monas translation of Crime and Punishment

Includes an introduction by Leonard Stanton and James D. Jr. Hardy, a translator's preface, an afterword by Robin Feuer Miller, a reading guide (online)

Available as a mass market paperback (ISBN 9780451530066, 560 pages).

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Get the Signet Classics Monas translation of Crime and Punishment

Includes an introduction by Leonard Stanton and James D. Jr. Hardy, a translator's preface, an afterword by Robin Feuer Miller, a reading guide (online)

Available as an ebook (ISBN 9781101142318).

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1985 · Julius Katzer · Crime and Punishment

Who is Julius Katzer?

I can’t find anything about him online. I keep running into my own Crime and Punishment information pages when I Google…

About the Katzer translation of Crime and Punishment

It was published by Raduga Publishers, a Soviet-era publishing house, in Moscow in 1985 and 1989.

Extract from the Katzer translation of Crime and Punishment

A short extract, but better than nothing!

Get the Raduga Katzer translation of Crime and Punishment

ISBN 9785050000149, 584 pages. This book is out of print. You may be able to find a used copy for sale online using the links below.

Available as a hardcover.

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Get the Raduga Katzer translation of Crime and Punishment

ISBN 9785050000149, 584 pages. This book is out of print. You may be able to find a used copy for sale online using the links below.

Available as a hardcover.

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1991 · David McDuff · Crime and Punishment

Who is David McDuff?

David McDuff is a British translator of Russian and Scandinavian poetry and prose, an editor and a literary critic. Penguin published his translations of Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov and The Idiot.

Penguin is a publishing powerhouse, so you’ll be in good company whether you choose the McDuff version or the Oliver Ready one. Older Penguin editions were translated by David Magarshack.

About the Penguin/McDuff translation of Crime and Punishment

Extract from the Penguin McDuff translation of Crime and Punishment

Get the Penguin Classics McDuff translation of Crime and Punishment

Includes an introduction, list for further reading, a note on translation, a note on money, endnotes, a reading guide (online)

Available as a paperback (ISBN 9780140449136, 718 pages).

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Get the Penguin Clothbound Classic McDuff translation of Crime and Punishment

Cover designed by Coralie Bickford-Smith in black/red.

Available as a hardcover (ISBN 9780241347683, 720 pages).

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1992 · Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky · Crime and Punishment

Who are Pevear and Volokhonsky?

Pevear and Volokhonsky are an American/Russian husband-and-wife team with a huge list of Russian translations, including War and Peace, to their credit. They became widely known in the US when Oprah chose their version of Anna Karenina for her book club.

There is a LOT of chatter about Pevear and Volokhonsky. Their translations are popular but produced a strong backlash. Their style is characterized as being either “admirably accurate” or “too literal”. I’m not positively inclined towards their version; I have the sense that their stuff has been over-hyped.

About the Pevear and Volokhonsky translation of Crime and Punishment

Extract from The Pevear and Volokhonsky translation of Crime and Punishment

Get the Everyman's Library Pevear and Volokhonsky translation of Crime and Punishment

Includes an introduction by W. J. Leatherbarrow, a bibliography, a chronology, a translator's note, endnotes.

Available as a hardcover (ISBN 9780679420293, 608 pages).

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Get the Vintage Pevear and Volokhonsky translation of Crime and Punishment

It includes a foreword, translators' note and endnotes.

Available as a paperback (ISBN 9780679734505, 565 pages).

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2014 · Oliver Ready · Crime and Punishment

Who is Oliver Ready?

Oliver Ready is a British translator. His version of Crime and Punishment, his first translation of a classic work, seems well respected; some people seem to consider it the best thing since sliced bread. Personally, I don’t like either of the current covers, and I think I prefer the older, smoother sound of Garnett to this newer but supposedly more authentically “jagged” language Ready uses.

About the Oliver Ready translation of Crime and Punishment

Extract from The Oliver Ready translation of Crime and Punishment

Get the Penguin Deluxe Ready translation of Crime and Punishment

It includes wrap-around cover art by Zohar Lazar, an introduction, a chronology, a list for further reading, a note on translation, a list of characters, note on names, a preface to notes and notes.

Available as a paperback (ISBN 9780143107637, 608 pages).

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Get the Penguin Ready translation of Crime and Punishment

It includes a note on the translation, a note on names, a list of characters, a chronology, an introduction, a preface to the notes, endnotes, a list for further reading.

Available as an ebook (ISBN 9780698194151).

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Get the Penguin Ready translation of Crime and Punishment

It includes a note on the translation, a note on names, a list of characters, a chronology, an introduction, a preface to the notes, endnotes, a list for further reading.

Available as a paperback (ISBN 9780141192802, 752 pages).

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2017 · Nicolas Pasternak Slater · Crime and Punishment

Who is Nicolas Pasternak Slater?

Nicholas Pasternak Slater is the nephew of Russian novelist Boris Pasternak, author of Doctor Zhivago, and has translated Doctor Zhivago into English for The Folio Society. He was raised bilingual and has a degree in Russian literature from Oxford. He began translation work after retiring from a career as a medical doctor.

About the Slater translation of Crime and Punishment

Extract from the Oxford Slater translation of Crime and Punishment

Get the Oxford World's Classics Slater translation of Crime and Punishment

It was edited by Sarah J. Young and includes: an introduction, a note on translation, a note on table of ranks, a bibliography, a chronology, a map of St Petersburg, a list of characters, notes.

Available as a paperback (ISBN 9780198709718, 544 pages).

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Get the Oxford World's Classics Slater translation of Crime and Punishment

It was edited by Sarah J. Young and includes: an introduction, a note on translation, a note on table of ranks, a bibliography, a chronology, a map of St Petersburg, a list of characters, notes.

Available as an ebook (ISBN 9780198707753).

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Get the Oxford World's Classics Slater translation of Crime and Punishment

It was edited by Sarah J. Young and includes: an introduction, a note on translation, a note on table of ranks, a bibliography, a chronology, a map of St Petersburg, a list of characters, notes.

Available as a hardcover (ISBN 9780198709701, 544 pages).

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2018 · Michael R. Katz · Crime and Punishment

Who is Michael R. Katz?

Michael Katz is an Emeritus Professor of Russian and East European Studies and the translator of over a dozen Russian novels. His translation is the newest of the whole batch. I’m impressed by the wealth of features in the Norton Critical Edition; the branding of the Liveright edition points to accessibility.

About the Katz translation of Crime and Punishment

  • Bloggers Karamazov: “Translating Crime and Punishment”
    “In this series of posts, Bloggers Karamazov sits down with the translators to talk about the experience of translating Dostoevsky’s most famous novel.”
  • The Nation: “Floating in the Air” by Jennifer Wilson
    “Katz has added something with his own translation: Hoping to accentuate what he calls the novel’s “richness of registers or tones,” he pays specific attention to how Dostoyevsky’s characters alternate between religious solemnity and drunken vulgarity. The new work also has an American simplicity and informality that sets it apart from Ready’s more elegant British rendering.”

Extract from The Katz translation of Crime and Punishment

Get the Norton Critical Edition Katz translation of Crime and Punishment

Includes a preface; a list of characters; a map, material from the authors notes, letters, and drafts; 26 critical essays; a chronology, serialization, a bibliography.

Available as a paperback (ISBN 9780393264272, 576 pages).

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Get the Norton Critical Edition Katz translation of Crime and Punishment

Includes a preface; a list of characters; a map, material from the authors notes, letters, and drafts; 26 critical essays; a chronology, serialization, a bibliography.

Available as an ebook (ISBN 9780393270167).

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Get the Liveright Katz translation of Crime and Punishment

Includes an introduction, note on the translation, list of characters, note on characters' names.

Available as a hardcover (ISBN 9781631490330, 621 pages).

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Get the Liveright Katz translation of Crime and Punishment

Includes an introduction, note on the translation, list of characters, note on characters' names.

Available as a paperback (ISBN 9781631495311, 621 pages).

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Conclusion

Get the Garnett translation of Crime and Punishment Free

If you don’t want to spend a lot of time on the decision process, probably any translation would be fine.

Crime and Punishment [is] a story with a power that bursts through any English version. — Washington Post

Personally I am convinced of the virtue of the Garnett translation, not simply because it is abundant and cheap or even free, or because that’s the one I read (which it was). Generations of readers have accessed Russian classics by means of Garnett’s translations; they are, themselves, classics.

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